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NoveList Becomes Newest Libhub Initiative Sponsor

We're pleased to announce that NoveList has become a Libhub Initiative Sponsor. “NoveList is supporting the Libhub initiative because we believe that linked data has the potential to ensure a bright future for public libraries,” says Roger Rohweder, NoveList co-founder and Senior Director of Technology. You can read official announcements from Zepheira, the founder of the Libhub Initiative, and from NoveList/EBSCO Information Services.  You can also learn more about how your organization or you as an individual can support the Libhub Initiative. Link On!

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Register for Zepheira Webinar on Linked Data for Academic Libraries – October 2, 2015

Zepheira is offering a free Webinar for those looking to learn about what Linked Data technologies have to offer to Academic Libraries on Friday October 2, 2015. “Linked Data 101: Using Web Technologies to Better Reveal Resources in Academic Libraries” aims to introduce the basic concepts of the Semantic Web, Linked Data, and its relevance to both library visibility and the often hidden relationships between resources in a collection. Learn more from the announcement and register today. Space is limited to first 100 registrants.

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Prediction: Adoption of Linked Data in Academic and Research Libraries in 2-3 Years

The 2015 Library Edition of the Horizon Report relates with this astonishing fact: popular search engines can only touch about 10% of the Internet; the remaining 90% are websites that are not indexed currently because most of this data is located in library catalogs in formats that cannot be searched or is guarded in secure areas that cannot be accessed by bots (p. 42).  The crux of the Libhub Initiative is about surfacing the hidden content in library catalogs. The Libhub Initiative is a place to share information about making this content visible on the Web.

We would like to draw your attention to what the 2015 report says about the speed by which this content might be made visible. It predicts that in two to three years, there will be widespread adoption of the semantic web and linked data in academic and research libraries.  [FYI, the semantic web infers the meaning of information on the Internet using metadata to make connections and display related information that would otherwise be elusive.] The New Media Consortium uses its Horizon Report to forecast how quickly certain technology will be adopted in academic and research libraries.

The report cites the power of linked data to “create an unobstructed way for students and researchers to find and connect with meaningful and relevant information, derived from as many credible sources as possible.”  It concludes that libraries are in “a unique position to benefit from the increased exposure the contextualization that semantic tools offer.” The report continues, “Library catalogs can increase access to valuable resources if their metadata is an interoperable part of the semantic web and not siloed in separate ontologies and databases.”

Intrigued? If you would like to dig deeper, turn to the report (p. 43) for examples of the semantic web and linked data in practice in academic and research library settings around the world. It also recommends articles and resources.

Joan K. Lippincott of the Center for Networked Information shared the following summary of some of the report’s other findings:

"Increasing the Value of the User Experience" and "Prioritization of Mobile Content and Delivery" are key short-term impact trends driving changes in academic and research libraries over the next one to two years. The "Evolving Nature of the Scholarly Record" and "Increasing Focus on Research Data Management" are mid-term impact trends expected to accelerate technology use in the next three to five years; and "Increasing Accessibility of Research Content" and "Rethinking Library Spaces" are long-term impact trends, anticipated to impact libraries for the next five years or more. 

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#LODLAM?!

There are some great descriptions of linked open data written for library professionals online. This time we’re sharing one with the provocative title, “What is #LODLAM?!,” and the much more explicit subtitle, “Understanding Linked Open Data in Libraries, Archives [and Museums].

These presentation slides were designed by Alison Hitchens and shared by Alison with a Creative Commons license. She is the Cataloging and Metadata Librarian at the University of Waterloo Library. She delivered this presentation at the Ontario Library Association’s Superconference earlier this year. Enjoy.

Click on the image below to go to the slides.


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Zepheira's Uche Ogbuji and Mark Baker Presenting at "Balisage: The MarkUp Conference"

“Balisage: The Markup Conference” is where serious markup practitioners and theoreticians meet every August. This year, on August 10 in Washington DC, there’s a pre-conference symposium of special interest to libraries, archives, and museums. It’s dedicated to cultural heritage markup, i.e., using Markup to preserve, understand, and disseminate cultural heritage materials.

 

Zepheira’s Uche Ogbuji and Mark Baker are presenting “Data transforms, patterns and profiles for 21st century Cultural Heritage.”

Here’s their description of their presentation.

In the early part of the 21st century, it's a near certainty that your local library provides web access, free WiFi, or both. Go! From the library, search the Web for information about books or music or film. Despite the fact that useful materials related to your search might be right there in the library, library’s resources might be nowhere in the search results. This applies to memory organization’s records too. Although libraries were early adopters of computer technologies, they now need to take action to be visible on the Web.

It’s vital to teach the Web how to interpret a library’s catalog and memory organization’s records. We’ll discuss making it simpler and easier to convert from legacy library information formats such as MARC/XML to widely adopted web formats such as HTML and Linked Data. Providing libraries with a fast, flexible way to make their catalogs more idiomatically "on the web" will put libraries at the center of information discovery.

As soon as Balisage posts the proceedings we’ll notify the Libhub Initiative community.


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Customer Benefits from Making Library Data Visible

Nothing’s better than hearing from early adopters. Read on to hear from your peers at libraries in Dallas and Colorado who have transformed their library catalogs into a Web-friendly format.

 

“…until recently there was no way to find library material without first going to the catalog. This is all about to change…you will begin to see links to our catalog appear in your [Web] searches… So often at the library we hear sentences that begin, “I didn’t know the library had…” By making our data accessible to search engines we hope that new, existing, and potential customers will discover that there is far more available at their library than they realized.” -- from the Dallas Public Library blog in Texas

 “Through participation in this project, Anythink’s catalog is now even more accessible to customers. [We can] showcase our resources online alongside those you might see from Wikipedia or Amazon.”  -- from Anythink Libraries in Colorado

“…our data is live as of June 22, 2015. It's been translated into a format designed for search engine bots to read it and link it to other resources on the web… [The goal is to] improve the ability for people to discover our resources on the open Web. The goal is ultimately that users would then be able to click and be taken back to the library’s catalog” From Arapahoe District Library in Colorado


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We Love the Library, but We Live on the Web

Innovative Interfaces (www.iii.com), a Libhub Initiative Sponsor, just released the following report:  “We Love the Library, but We Live on the Web.” After surveying more than 4,000 library users at seven academic libraries in the UK, researchers concluded that users rank access from anywhere – on any device – as their highest priority. The report’s quantitative data corroborates why libraries should be exposing more of their data to the Web. 

Click on the image below to launch the report in a new window.

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Linked Data Design for the Visible Library

You might like this article from ASIS&T's Bulletin, April/May 2015 because it directly addresses libraries’ frustration over their rich resources being invisible on the web. It describes a different approach toward data modeling and metadata so that previously invisible resources gain visibility through linking.The piece is written by Zepheira's Eric Miller and Uche Ogbuji

Click on the image below to launch the article in a new window.

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Denver Public Library has Launched Linked Data Records

"Our data is live now, it's been translated into a format designed for search engine bots to read it and link it to other resources on the Web," writes Rachel Fewell, Collection Services Manager at Denver Public Library in Colorado. Rachel is leading Denver Public Library's adoption of BIBFRAME and is an active member of the Libhub Initiative. Read on for Rachel's blog post on the Denver Public Library's website.

Click on the image below to launch the post in a new window.


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